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by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
the obama administration is telling americans who are in japan it's time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," "disaster in japan" with matt lauer and meredith vieira live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. it feels like a sign of just how desperate things are in japan that they're willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> take a look. you're looking at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannesens, the kind you maybe have seen police use on rioters are going to be used to hose down reactors from the ground. the latest on this desperate attempt coming up just ahead. >>> meanwhile, growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of this situation. the chair of the u.s. regulator
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
is and the melting nuclear melting in japan shows how perilous our dependence on nuclear power is and they underscore our failure to have a broad based energy portfolio and our failure to have a rational look at our energy usage. mr. russo, - to set prices are determined by supply and demand globally, and several of you have said that sort of thing. let me ask i guess the first mr. newell, what is the scale and let's put it in perspective here of possible short term energy production. i mean, suppose there were a lot more leases for offshore drilling released in the last couple of years to hear the curious oppose or even a in the drilling on private land. what is the scale of the increase in production we might achieve compared to what opec can do by turning defaults up and down in the short term? >> welcome there is a considerable lag in the increased access resources and an expiration and the element and the ultimate protection of the resources so there's an important issue would return to the time scale which i think you mentioned in the short run to respond to the immediate impact send crude oil
it the largest public debt in japan hit a wall. the japanese debt is about double the size of its $5 trillion economy. it is not a question of whether they are too big to fail. many of the photographs have become part of the picture two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck japan. the crisis in japan and the impact on global economics. springfield, ill., back to your calls, republicans only, what issues will define the gop primary next year? good morning. caller: i think the biggest issue is for whoever the candidate or is is for them to espouse conservative values. if they are very conservative in their policy or the programs that they put forth, that will attract a lot of the common americans whether they are democrats or republicans or independents. i think most americans espousing those views. to me, it will be about conservatism and pocketbook issues. it will be about whether or not they feel they are better off than they were four years ago. i don't see that happening. i think there is a malaise and a true conservative candidate will be able to marshal the forces to be elected i
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
deemployed in japan. it did very well. the team over was were not affected by the recent events in japan. we're thankful for that. it is connected to the c2bmc in hawaii, and as said before, our ship, especially our surveillance capability in the sea of japan is shown here. this is our initial capability. it shows one layer of defense in the three charts i've just shown. next chart. when we moved to 2015, our aim is to go from an initial capability to a robust capability. again, how do you define "robust?" there's not a clear definition, and i'll state what the agency adopted and in concert with the ballistic missile defense review conducted last year was one interpretation of robust, and it's ours is that when a missile's launched at you, you have opportunities to shoot it with multiple systems, independent technologies engaging that are integrated together through a center network again taking multiple views using multiple freak sighs so that -- frequencies to that is makes it very resilient capability, and by 2015 with the introduction of the sm32a, you can also see the introduction on th
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. members will hear from the head of our nuclear regulatory commission, 10:00 a.m. eastern. although later in the day, live on c-span3 8:45 eastern, congressional correspondents dinner. rand paul and anthony wiener of new york, and others. >> for more than a quarter decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant. muammar gaddafi. he is denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorize innocent people around the world. >> follow what key leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the president and other administration officials, from the house and senate floor, and other leaders around the world, all on line at the c-span video library board search, watch, click, and share any time. >> in libya tuesday, the u.s. struck a missile storage facility near tripoli will forces loyal to muammar gaddafi the drove back rebels near his home town. in london, foreign ministers and representatives of more than 40 countries met to discuss how to deal with libya. after that meeting, british foreign secreta
problems, even to the point of crisis in the next few years. many people have said japan is locked in crisis, that crisis is coming because of the debt that they've accumulated. when that comes to america, do we want to have government by crisis? already we can't even pass a budget. we can't pass appropriations bills. our bills do not even go to the committees anymore. they just come to the floor and we put a patchwork quilt on them and there's a chance this ends up being two more weeks. it is not the way you should run government. if you want to have a significant plan for changing things, send things through the committee. if up to the have a realistic way of running government, have appropriations bills. if you want to be someone who believes in good, responsible government, for goodness sakes, pass a budget. we didn't pass a budget last year. this chart shows how big the problem is. i wish i had a magnifying glass because that's the only way you could see the other side's proposal. $6 billion in cuts. it's one day's borrowing. it's not even one day's spending that they're talki
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15